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A Nationwide Directory Of Raccoon Control Professionals

Photographs of Raccoon Poop

The below photos should help you properly identify the animal poop that you see. These are pictures of raccoon poop. If you see these types droppings in your attic or yard, they were made by a raccoon. Please DO NOT TOUCH RACCOON FECES. It can contain raccoon roundworm, which can infect people, and cause blindness and other terrible symptoms. Call your local pro and you will get free advice about how to handle and clean raccoon droppings.

Click here for my nationwide list of 100's of professional raccoon trappers serving all 50 states.

RACCOON POOP DESCRIPTION: Fairly large, like dog poo. Averages 3/4 inch in diameter. The sides are usually textured, and the tips are often rounded or broken off. The surefire giveaway is if there are berries in the poop. Raccoon feces commonly have berries, so if you see them, it's definitely raccoon.



The above image of raccoon feces was photographed in the attic of a house with a raccoon problem. I was able to identify the type of animal by inspecting the turds. Once I know what type of critter is in the house or the crawlspace, ceiling, yard, or any other part of the property, I can take the proper steps to get rid of the unwanted wildlife.

Does raccoon poop cause any health risk or disease concerns? Yes. Raccoon Roundworm in both people and pets is caused by contact with infected raccoon feces, which can pass the eggs to humans. Contracting this disease occurs by ingestion or even inhalation of the eggs. Infection of humans can lead to larval parasites, which affect the central nervous system. In addition to roundworm, Giardia lamblia is a protozoan causing diarrhea, and is caused by ingesting food or water contaminated by raccoon excrement.



The above picture is part of a raccoon latrine - lots of feces and pee. I have more pics of raccoon poop here on my website, or I can send some more to you if you write to me. I don't think anyone else out there has as many images of raccoon poop and droppings as me - I often take photos of animal droppings to show the customer what kind of animal they have, and so that they can decide if they need me to clean up the raccoon waste, the scat and urine, and decontaminate. If you need to know how to identify raccoon poop, pictures such as the ones above are the best bet, but you can take a photograph and send it to me, and I'll tell you what kind of animal droppings you have.

How do I clean up the raccoon latrine? You must remove the feces by hand, including any soiled and dirty insulation and bag it in plastic bags. Be sure to wear gloves and a HEPA respirator mask, and even a Tyvek suit. I then spray / fog the area with a special enzyme cleaner, but any good disinfectant will suffice for some of it. To kill raccoon roundworm, you need a special cleaner. Read more info on my: attic cleanup and restoration page.

Customer email about raccoon poo:

Hello, Thank you for all the work you have put into informing the public about animals in the wrong places. I am in the tree service business and have minimal experience with live trapping. We bought our house in 1991 and at the time, the home was vacant for 3 years. We are in Grosse Pointe, Michigan and are near a large, old wooded golf coarse. When we got the house, it had many problems, one was infestation. Ants, mice, and Raccoons. The attic was absolutely full of raccoon shit, and mouse crap too. The elderly women that owned the house fed the birds (religiously) and boarded cats and dogs for people. I found four inches of rotten bird feed in the sub floor in the garage storage closets. The exterminator (at the time) said "It was the largest population of mice in a devilling I have ever encountered". We had a raccoon in the attic and it was finally eliminated (live trapped and relocated). The house (a one story ranch) had screened in air vents (under the overhangs) that I put a double layer of 1/4" hardware cloth over and new moldings that proved to discourage entry. Since then, no problems until 3 years ago, when I found them under our deck, nesting inside a window well. The female had pups and we watched them age (through the glass in the basement). When fall came, and they went to make their own way, I put a few moth balls out and closed off the entry way and thought, problem solved. Last month while pruning a tree, I found (on the other side of the house) an entry way in the overhang air vent (that was never re-enforced with the hardware cloth upgrade......dumbass). My eleven year old daughters' bedroom is right under that part of the attic and we here the goings on at dawn and dusk. This house has a very low angle roof line and almost a flat roof (Frank Lloyd Wright style). The attic is more a belly crawl space and really complicated the last removal efforts. I don't think I can reach the raccoon latrine. In the north, when do you think the cubs will be moving on? I have a nice, big, Havahart live trap. Jim

My response: Raccoon cubs move on in 6 months, but I'd try to get them out sooner, by manual removal, because you don't want that racoon feces building up in your attic.

I've also written a page about raccoon urine, which also contaminates attic spaces, and can promote wood rot.
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